In Praise of The Pinecone

A mysterious empty niche at St. Ninian's Well. Sarah Losh built the current stonework facing of St. Ninian's Well near Brisco.

Sarah Losh built the current stonework facing of St. Ninian’s Well near Brisco. Note the traditional motif of the filled lozenge, and that there is room for God in the empty niche, even as there is in the empty niche in Wreay’s wonderful Church.

My wife and I have just enjoyed The Pinecone. The story of Sarah Losh, romantic, heroine, architect and visionary by Jenny Uglow, published by Faber and Faber. I recommend it to anyone interested in Cumbrian life and history of art and architecture as a detailed and highly readable biography of a very accomplished lady who lived in the Cumbrian village of Wreay near Carlisle and built there the amazing St. Mary’s Church.

It is nothing short of a ‘Wonder’ in the original sense of the word, popularised in the classical ancient world. She appears to me to have profoundly influenced culture in Britain and abroad and this book greatly helps contextualize her life work, I would say ‘grounds’ it but for its elevated nature. It appears to be a work that celebrates the wonders of God’s Creation from ages past through to modernity, reflecting Sarah’s considerable learning from poet /philosopher friends and travels in Britain, France and Italy and appears to anticipate the Arts and Crafts movement by decades, post-modernity by a century. Furthermore, the book leaves a resounding impression of her overall niceness, as well as her greatness. She improved a lot of lives in the course of her own, both during her own life and as her lasting legacy.

The book describes her upbringing in the early C19th midst an accomplishing family of enlightened industrialist philanthropists very much plugged-in to the exciting spirit of the times with its rapidly evolving understanding of the natural sciences, geology, biology, chemistry and physics, the latters’ application to the service of mankind through major industrial production in the northeast and to lesser extent in Carlisle, the adoption and expansion of steam in mechanized production and in the expansion of the railways. Her childhood and later formative experience was really very blessed, her grasp of languages gifted and her contact with important poets, thinkers, creative industrialists and art from ancient to modern profoundly impressive.

It’s really interesting to read of the family connection to Newton Arlosh on the Solway and of the commercial turbulence of the times with its occasional widespread swings in fortune, the booms in the textile industry and in expansion of weaving, dying and colour printing, the profitable work from home followed by the sudden market collapses and panicky runs on the banks, then re-employment through the new construction boom of the rail network. It’s amazing to think that for the first time, normal people could wear colourful clothes, up until then, only the preserve of nobility, royalty and clergy. Sarah witnessed, and her family was part of, so much change. The family fortunes and those of their friends were rather fundamentally entwined with the prosperity of the north of England and thus the rest of the country.

I clearly remember our first visit to his highly unusual and spectacular church as a magical experience. Though I was struck by the singular external features of the building with its unfamiliar shape, amazing carvings and gargoyles, all that in no way prepared my mind for the startling quality of the interior. Make sure that you are the first to open the door and you’ll experience primordial darkness being illuminated at your entrance. Combined with the richness of the interior that’s very heady.

A friend had taken us to Wreay and St. Ninian’s well in nearby Brisco among other interesting sites that featured holy springs / wells on one of our antiquarian adventures together. I saw so much there that now makes sense having read this well-researched book by Jenny Uglow. Jenny’s book goes a long way interpreting the imagery and yet none of the mystery of the place seems lost in the process. I urge you to visit for yourself and to read the book.

I also missed the significance of a great deal of what I saw and having read this book we will now return with better-informed eyes. When I viewed the carvings of beetles, butterflies, plants and fossils, I was impressed and put in mind of London’s great Natural History Museum. I didn’t know quite what to make of the monstrous gargoyles, winged turtles, serpents and dragon except that I liked them and was impressed by their eccentricity and forceful presence. They are the sort of grand features that you might expect to see on an ancient ‘lost temple’ in a tropical jungle somewhere! Sarah clearly enjoyed building this Wonder.

The interior of St. Mary's Church in Wreay, near Carlisle in Cumbria, England.

St. Mary’s Church in Wreay is truly a Wonder. It feels rather Byzantine, like an early Romano-Christian Basilica. With its rounded Norman arches and wealth of imagery of enlightenment and rebirth from the ‘spiritual strata of history’, it is a glorious place of worship. Image captured on Sigma DP2, ISO 400 1/8th of a second at F4.

This building strikes me as one of Britain’s ‘collegiate chapels’ with lessons graven in bog oak, stone and plaster, paint and stained glass. How interesting it would have been to have sat in on the conversations at her dining table. The author explains that by embodying the principles that she, and the poet William Wordsworth held dear, those of purity, simplicity and rusticity she boldly rejected the Gothic and returned to the pluralistic origins of the early Church while grounding this in very local materials and workmanship. The heron lectern is very English. She created so much with her own hands; and employed local craftsmen and used local materials to create a work in praise of Creation, how ingenious is that! The building is informed by her amassed knowledge and full of allegory and symbolism of pre-Celtic nature coupled with images from recent geological scientific discovery. There’s something very post-modernist in this re-visitation of classical material within a modern framework, she dares to include images of ancient life forms that turned up in pursuit of the coal that powered industrial modernity as if to say “All creation is of God, who is Man to prescribe what God has done?” That’s my interpretation not Jenny’s.

While a good deal of this imagery is interpreted by Jenny, still many mysteries remain and I feel that layers of meaning, overlap like the scales of a pinecone and are yet to be uncovered, to my eyes at any rate. They are likely here in this book for you to read if you can see them. The symbolism of the pinecone is explored nicely on pages 213-214 and the extent of “buried religious connections” within the church listed as “Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Hindu, Buddhist — the strata of spiritual rather than geological time.” How well the author conveys the spiritual make-up of this building. I think it echoes the bold and then quite radical recognition of the truly ancient nature of creation and recreation. Brilliant!  

Blessed as it was, Sarah’s life was not untouched by sorrows. There is something terribly tragic about her bereavements, the loss of her sister Katherine who was her closest companion and the loss of her beloved William were so deeply felt. William, the one man who might have become her husband sent Sarah a pinecone from Afghanistan, where he was killed a short time after.

Without sister or husband, she built her glorious church. As well as being courageous, Sarah was very modest. I agree with Jenny, I don’t think it is an exaggeration to say that Sarah Losh is probably one of the most important non-famous people in British history. She deserves to be more widely celebrated, though she never courted fame.  A spirit of enlightenment, her achievements would have been great coming from a man of her times, from a woman in those times they seem all the more remarkable as there were such restrictive expectations.

Her resounding message to us all through the ages to come, male and female might be “you can do it. We did. ”

No visit to Cumbria is complete without a stop at St. Mary’s, Wreay and perhaps a short prayer of thanks for the life and works of Sarah Losh.

 

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Carlisle Toy Fair Returns March 25th 2018

Model steam engines at Carlisle Toy Fair

Did I forget to mention steam engines? Whether you’re looking for something you used to have or something that you always wanted, there’re all manner of fun toys and models and Carlisle’s Toy Fair!

If you enjoy models, toys, figures, games, Sci-fi, TV and film memorabilia and other fun collectibles then you might seriously enjoy Carlisle’s Toy Fair. The Spring date is March 25th and there’ll be a lot of traders with interesting tables full of well-loved treasures from toy boxes past, collectors cabinets and attics!

There’s a slightly different offering every time but certain things you can count on seeing, lovely models from such great manufacturers as Corgi, Matchbox, Dinky and Triang. Trains from Hornby, planes, cars, tanks and ships from Airfix. Figures from Britains and Palitoy.  All sorts of great stuff to collect or play with! Usually there are also cabinets and cases to put your expanding collection in, as well.

Note that as well as shopping for your stuff you can also bring along your own things to swap or part exchange with the traders, so you might want to have a look in your attic and dust off your own models, doll’s houses, farm sets, ponies etc.

Yes, there’s plenty of interest for lasses too!

There'll even be two display cabinet traders at this Carlisle Toy Fair, so you can organise and showcase your treasures!

Help to organise and showcase your treasures!

Model cars and trucks and much more , Carlisle Toy Fair is an ideal hunting ground for for collectors and Christmas shoppers alike.

Model cars and trucks and much more , Carlisle Toy Fair is an ideal hunting ground for collectors and shopping for birthdays and Christmas!

Take The Church Tower Challenge for The Church Organ Restoration Project

the church organ is in need of restoration.

The aim is to raise £40,000 for the church organ restoration fund.

Have you ever wanted to abseil down a church tower? Well, this summer you can! By taking The Church Tower Challenge on 30th June and 1st July you can abseil down one of the finest church towers in the UK! Often described as a miniature cathedral, St.Lawrence’s Church in Crosby Ravensworth is known for its fine architecture, stained glass and interesting carvings. This is also a rare opportunity to look out over the Lyvennet valley at height.

Above all though, you can raise funds in aid of St.Lawrence’s  organ restoration fund while abseiling down the front of the tower! You can either get yourself sponsored or you can just pay £10 a go.

In addition, there’s an open gardens event in the village of Crosby ravensworth on July 1st and there’ll be refreshments at the village hall.

Humourous cartoon advertising the Church Tower challenge 2018

 

All text and images by Charles Paxton, he received no payment for this article.

C-ART FESTIVAL – Make An Exhibition of Yourself at Rheged

EDEN ARTS || C-ART FESTIVAL 2017
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C-ART FESTIVAL 3 DAYS TO GO

Come As You Are…with Bill Leslie & Alex Bradley

FREE EVENT – NO PRE-BOOKING REQUIRED at Rheged 9th & 10th September Come as you are, is a participatory performance about you. Exploring how individuals perceive themselves, Come As You Are engages people in a unique way. Audience members contribute information about themselves prior to the event via open invitation, then stand on a small, revolving stage in a public space with their own surtitle. You are the exhibit. Come As You Are playfully recontextualises the relationship between writer, performer, audience & participant.

 

MORE INFO & PERFORMANCE TIMES HERE
FULL C-ART FESTIVAL LINE UP
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Chamber of Commerce Event: Communication Planning


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Creating a communications plan – promoting your organisation, protecting and growing your business reputation

 

What is communication planning?

 

Communications is more than press releases, advertising copy and social media, it is the backbone of ensuring your key messages reach the right people, in the right way and at precisely the right time to maximise the benefits for your business.

 

If you get your communications right, even in difficult times you can not only maintain your business reputation, you can grow it.

 

Following a 7-point plan, you can ensure you are always on leading the conversations – with your employees, your teams, the media and public.

 

Join Cumbria Chamber of Commerce and Karen Morley-Chesworth of Chesworth Communications, 13th September, 10am to 4pm, Newton Rigg Conference Centre, Penrith.

 

From this course, you will have:

  • A template to work from for all your future communications
  • Create a strategy which brings together your organisations marketing, PR and engagement
  • The tool to ensure you always maximise the communications opportunities for your organisation

This course will give you a strategy to ensure you manage your engagement with all your stakeholders. By the end of this one-day course you will be able to:

 

  • Create a communications plan for your organisation, and integrate your market, PR and engagement work
  • Identify your audiences through stakeholder analysis
  • Use your communications plan to deliver high quality, effective communications that ensure your key messages land well, and enhance your organisations reputation.

 

Cumbria Chamber of Commerce, in association with Karen Morley-Chesworth of Chesworth Communications are running a one-day course that will give you the tools and confidence to manage your communications across your organization.

 

The course content includes:

  • The basic principles of communication
  • Understand what strategic communications is and how it benefits every aspect of your business
  • How effective communications help you manage multiple goals and relationships
  • How to research your audience and tailor your messages to their needs
  • Basic principles of crisis management
  • Basic principles of writing copy
  • How to manage internal & external relationships
  • Looking at how communications professionals develop persuasive messages to realise their organisations goals
  • How to evaluate your communications to ensure you get value for money.

On-going support

This one-day course in communications planning is supported by one-month online mentoring from Chesworth Communications. This additional time will ensure you have support to put your new communications plan into action, and provide additional guidance for new communications strategies you want to develop.

 

Membership of the Chesworth Communications Training Group

 

To support your ongoing communications skills development, those who complete a Chesworth Communications course receive membership to the Training Group which receives regular updates on communications, tips and access to additional online media training.

 

Members of the Chesworth Communications Training Group also receive 10% discount on future in-house courses, including bespoke media training.

 

An additional benefit is 10% discount on sponsorship and promotional campaigns through cumbria24.com.

 

Who will benefit? This course is for those who are responsible for managing marketing, PR and engagement tasks as part of their business, including internal communications. If you are looking to improve your communications strategy to protect and enhance your reputation, expand and improve your business messages, and create cost effective communications, this one-day course will benefit you and your business.

 

About Karen Morley-Chesworth

 

Karen has more than 30 years’ experience in media and communications, working as a journalist and communications specialist for lead news and public sector organisations.

She is a partner in Chesworth Communications, which provides media training and services to leading businesses in the north of England, as well as publishing cumbria24.com.

Karen is a popular media trainer with Cumbria Chamber of Commerce, recognised for her practical courses with tools you can put into action and get immediate results.

You can find out more about Chesworth Communications at www.chesworthcommunications.com and about Karen via her LinkedIn page https://www.linkedin.com/in/karenmorleychesworth/

 

The delegate rate for this workshop is £65 + VAT for members, for non-members £120 + VAT. To book and pay for your place(s) please : BOOK HERE

 

For queries or further information email catherynn@cumbriachamber.co.uk

 

Any cancellations must be received at least three working days prior to the event, otherwise you will be charged for non-attendance.

 

Chamber Business Solutions is also able to deliver bespoke and in-house training – with our highly experienced team of trainers and subject matter experts we are committed to assisting you get the business results you need to achieve. For further information on how we can help your business please contact catherynn@cumbriachamber.co.uk

 

Regards

Catherynn

 

 

 

Catherynn Dunstan

 

catherynn@cumbriachamber.co.uk

07841 743067

 

 

Cumbria Chamber of Commerce – the Ultimate Business Network
 
networking & events policy & representation member services business support
 
For further information on our services, visit our website at www.cumbriachamber.co.uk
 

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The Visual Nature of Lakeland

Sheep in Great Langdale valley with neolithic axe factory in background.

Sheep in Great Langdale valley with neolithic axe factory in background.

In George Monbiot’s recent article Black Box, he describes his frustrated difficulty in communicating with any of the key decision makers at UNESCO in relation to his thoughts on World Heritage Site designation for Cumbria’s Lake District as expressed in his previous article Fell Purpose. In that article, George raised some interesting and valid points but to my mind hasn’t actually established any sound grounds for a complaint against WHS designation for Lakeland, ecological or otherwise, see my previous post for my fuller analysis of the set of grievances voiced in his previous article on the subject. As I said before, there’s no reason why his desire for ecological restoration could not take place within a UNESCO WHS. His grievances strike me as genuinely innocent, underpinned by errors of comprehension and appreciation and fueled by a desire to see ecological restoration take place. UNESCO have already made their decision, correctly in my opinion, to designate the British Lake District as a World Heritage Site. To recap, the key points in favour of designation as I see it, are:

  1. Lakeland as we know and love it is a unique and discreet cultural landscape, not a purely natural one. Human interaction with the landscape for many thousands of years has created what we see today — a visually appealing patchwork of landscape features shaped by glaciation, traditional sheep grazing, forestry and tourism in the form of hiking, riding, boating and simply gazing. There are many scenes in Lakeland that are Tolkeinesque. Their charm is principally visual and clear views are important to their appreciation. The rich heritage of prehistoric monuments are embedded within the landscape, they were erected with regard to features within their landscape, aligned to geophysical points including other sites, as well as cardinal points. Their siting and orientation was deliberate. I am not alone in thinking that many natural features of Lakeland were probably revered as sacred, Saddleback being a good example; it is indeed possible that the whole mountainous area was considered holy.
  2. Our modern appreciation of landscape was greatly shaped by the poetic appreciation of illustrious visitors. The landscape influenced them and they, it. There are a lot of historically and culturally important sites within the designated area that are vulnerable to deterioration without proper maintenance and there is much scope for interpretation to make sense of landscape features, there’s much scope for making areas more accessible physically and in terms of interpretation. This is UNESCO’s area of expertise.
  3. Sheep aren’t responsible for Lakeland’s screes, these are from glacial erosion and it is as much due to glaciers and climatic conditions that we have the exposures of bare rock immortalized in water colour paintings and black and white photographs. Sheep grazing is an integral part of landscape management, few other creatures are hardy enough to graze the higher Fells and I don’t think George is advocating that our mountain views be maintained by lawn mowers, rather he’s thinking that they should be forested, but this would essentially change the cultural landscape which now and previously has always been visually oriented. People also enjoy seeing these sheep within the landscape, even if they’re being herded by farmers on ATVs. It’s the sheepdogs that help make it all manageable now as in previous centuries.  There’s also a very long tradition of industrial exploitation, the neolithic axe factories in Great Langdale are famous, but how many of us know that iron ore was mined by the Romans above Ulswater and transported from there by river for example?

Sheep are hardy managers of Lakeland landscape.

I agree with George’s assertions that there’s a lot of scope for ecological restoration and I think that there’s no reason why this would conflict with UNESCO’s mission, rather it can and should go hand in hand with sensitive planning!  For this to work well, there will obviously need to be open channels of communication between cultural and environmental conservation bodies and landowners and the visiting public. There are great opportunities here for sure. There are Arctic Char in some of the lakes, relict populations of the glacial melt at the end of the Pleistocene. Wouldn’t it be great to sensitively rewild some areas and restore some water meadows and other habitat for hardy traditional British megafauna, some made extinct here by man, but still living elsewhere in northern Europe? Eagles, beavers, elks, boars, wolves, bears?

UNESCO World Heritage Site Designation For Lakeland!

Buttermere reflecting Fells and trees in Cumbria's Lake District National Park. C.Paxton photo and copyright.

Buttermere reflecting Fells and trees in Cumbria’s Lake District National Park. C.Paxton photo and copyright.

I am thrilled to learn of the new UNESCO World Heritage Site designation for Cumbria’s Lake District. The BBC News article announced  “The Lake District has joined the likes of the Grand Canyon, the Taj Mahal and Machu Picchu by being awarded Unesco World Heritage status.”

Hooray! This is a very sound decision imho, a well-deserved status, I think. William Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter would likely be very pleased at the prospect. It matches all the qualifying criteria being a discreet area of outstanding and highly distinctive landscape quality with a great many sites that have globally recognized cultural value. Good decision, UNESCO and thank you very much.

World Heritage Site Designation For Lakeland – Some Thoughts

Lakeland landscape with Derwentwater Fells. C. Paxton image and copyright.

Lakeland landscape with Derwentwater Fells. C. Paxton image and copyright.

The pride is real. The British Lake District is worthy of World Heritage Site designation.

Elterwater with mallard duck presents idyllic Lakeland scenery. C. Paxton image and copyright.

Elterwater with mallard duck presents idyllic Lakeland scenery. C. Paxton image and copyright.

I feel compelled to write my reaction to George Monbiot’s May 19th article “Fell Purpose” , a highly stimulating article. Monbiot begins by saying that “The attempt to turn the Lake District into a World Heritage site would be a disaster”. I disagree, but he is right in saying that it is an almost irreversible move and worthy of due consideration, especially in the light of Brexit, as the area currently benefits from three billion pounds of E.U. funding annually. If people turn against the idea of designation as a UNESCO WHS then at least the gauntlet has been dropped and similar funding can then be sought from other more local sources.

The fact is that the Lakeland that we know and love depends very much upon active management from farmers, landowners, non-profit groups and volunteers as well as local and national government. There’s no way they’d let a disaster happen to Lakeland. They love it too.

In short Monbiot’s article presents an illusion of reality from selective observations and condemns plans to assist ‘preservation’ of English Lakeland at international expense begging the question of whether it would be developed in other (better?) ways if the area wasn’t made a WHS. Not only is there no evidence that that would happen, but he needs to explore the ideas of betterment out loud so that we can see the extent of them and ask why they couldn’t happen in a WHS?  In terms of ‘improvement’ he can’t simply equate progressive development with general aforestation. That image of the screes that he has selected for criticism of the region at large, is of Wastwater in Western Lakeland near Scarfell, which is famous for … its craggy screes. There are few other such dramatic screes elsewhere, they continue underwater in what is one of our deepest lakes, yet he would hold that glacial feature as an example of widespread ecological mistreatment and blame sheep for it. He’s being a bit heavy handed there.  Wastwater was never rainforest in the time of man, if you want that visit Lodore Falls. If people want clear views of Fell tops on the whole, and they do seem to, then cluttering them with trees isn’t a particularly bright idea. In fact the report notes that many fine viewpoints that were clear in Wordsworth’s day would benefit from sensitive and judicious clearance. There are already areas of native deciduous forest around Haweswater, Ulswater and Derwentwater for example that are gorgeous and on marginal rocky lowland and grazed.

On p.534 Only landscape character types B, E, F and G are listed as being in any condition equal to or lesser than moderate! I is moderate to good. So, it’s not in a parlous state by any means but there’s quite a lot of room for improvement.  On page 535 the biodiversity table shows the bulk of SSSIs 66%, as recovering. Monbiot is right, this could be better.

However, the real eye opener, I think is Table 4.1 the percentage of  listed buildings and scheduled monuments at risk! A lot of the scheduled monuments will be archaic ones such as the Cockpit. The Lake District has a wealth of heritage that is appreciated worldwide, why should it not receive the official recognition and accompanying financial support that it so richly deserves?

The supporting documents for the bid proposal make good reading for anyone interested in Cumbria’s Lake District (http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/caringfor/projects/whs/lake-district-nomination).

While there’s some truth in what George says about the size of the farms increasing and the need for subsidies to continue even in the face of Brexit, World Heritage Site status would probably suit the Lake District perfectly well as far as I can see because:

a) it’s mainly the farmers,  landowners and teams of volunteers who maintain the landscape and culture nexus that UNESCO wants to preserve. They wouldn’t want to cover the fells with trees anyway, some ravines and along watercourses perhaps but not the felltops, WHS would give a shot in the arm to the cultural and historical sites (some that have struggled to thrive through tourism only, e.g. my wife and I miss Cockermouth’s Sheep and Wool Centre now gone) and offer some degree of maintenance for scheduled monuments that are mostly looked after gratis by landowners.

b) UNESCO would likely act on the advice of the National Trust and Natural England, Eden Rivers Trust, English Heritage etc. with regard to policy decisions and improving public access facilities in a sensitive manner, they have acted sensibly elsewhere.

c) much of the tourism infrastructure is already in place, the grant money could be usefully employed repairing essential infrastructure and improving access and interpretation that benefit locals and visitors alike.

d) The Lake District has large tracts of sheepscape but there is native woodland with deer, cattle pasture with rare breeds, and there are pine plantations e.g. Grizedale some of which could be systematically replaced with native mixed deciduous forest over time, though our red squirrels like the pines too, as do many birds, so some conifers should certainly remain. Herdwicks are one of the few types of animal that will live year-round on some of the higher fells.

e) the elements considered most at risk are scheduled monuments and listed buildings – this is a primary concern of UNESCO.

f) there’s a lot of scope for sensitive and imaginative development for recreation and education.

 

The Carles of Catslerigg, near Keswick. C. Paxton image and copyright.

The Carles of Castlerigg, situated in some of England’s finest landscape near Keswick. One of Cumbria’s great Neolithic stone circles, it is also one of the oldest. C. Paxton image and copyright.

Fell walkers pause to admire the Cockpit on Moor Divock, Askham Common. C.Paxton. image and copyright

Fell walkers pause to admire the Cockpit on Moor Divock, Askham Common. C.Paxton. image and copyright

I think there are a lot of prehistoric sites that could benefit from the WHS status; a lot of cultural treasures made more accessible.  When you consider that the amazing rock art on the boulders at Chapel Style were only officially recognized in the 1990’s you can appreciate that there are other wonders awaiting (re)discovery! It’s really a very exciting area. The Moor Divock Necropolis leaps to mind as an example. A plateau 1000 ft above sea level, where chariots raced through one of Europe’s most interesting funerary complexes.  You could walk through it now without learning a thing about it. Sensitive archaeological exploration and interpretation would be great!  Much of the local archaeology was conducted in previous centuries. Amongst other notable monuments there’s a very rare ‘starfish cairn’ in the form of White Raise.

If farmers / landowners are paid to help maintain heritage sites that would be good, because many are maintaining them for nowt at the moment.

Moor Divock's Standing Stones, site number 4.

Moor Divock’s Standing Stones, site number 4 on Askham Common.

Lodore Falls, dramtically blurred by slow shutterspeed.

Lodore Falls, dramatic waterfall set in lush forest.

There’s certainly plenty of scope for selective reforestation and riparian improvements through re-meandering and restablishing water meadows, otteries, heronrys etc. Eden Rivers Trust have the know how.

Landowners / managers could perhaps be encouraged not to kill otters, foxes, badgers, eagles, harriers etc.  Is there scope for one or two beaveries and bear parks? Lordly stags and sounders of wild pigs might yet have their place.

What do you think?

The White Raise burial cairn has a rare 'starfish' shape.

The White Raise burial cairn has a rare ‘starfish’ shape.

Author with his father at Sinside great circle in Novemeber 2013.

Author with his father at Swinside great circle in November 2013.

Summer Pudding In Appleby, Anyone?Live Music, Circus Acts, Crafts Market, Cake Contest, Family Fun!

THIS SATURDAY: DON’T MISS THE SUMMER PUDDING AT APPLEBY CASTLE

BUY TICKETS NOW

Saturday 20th August COME ALONG, SHOW YOUR SUPPORT  Daytime: 1 Fairytale Castle,  3 Live Music stages, 4 Performance Stages, Funfair, Jaw-dropping Circus Acts, Crafty Vintage Market, Cake Competition, Children’s activities, woodland walk and more.

Night-time: Top festival bands on the inner bailey stage The Correspondents, Gypsy Hill & Sam and The Womp 

www.summerpudding.co.uk

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A FLOOD RECOVERY EVENT FOR APPLEBY: COME ALONG, SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

supported by Eden District Council, Cumbria Local Enterprise Partnership, Appleby Town Council, Cumberland & Westmoreland Herald, Country Puddings. An Eden Arts event.

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News from The Butchers Arms Community Pub

Here’s some news from The Butchers Arms Community Pub in Crosby Ravensworth

The Butcher's Arms

The new chef at The Butcher’s Arms has creative flair and has prepared meals for celebrities. C.Paxton photo and copyright

Reblogged from https://lyvennetcommunitypub.wordpress.com/2016/05/13/butchers-arms-update-2016-05-12/
Posted on 13/05/2016 by lvcpnews

Excellent new tenant landlords Stephen and Carrie are now serving at The Butchers Arms. All food is freshly cooked and the specials board changes regularly. There is a range of dishes to suit all tastes.

There is a position of a Commis Chef available so please contact Steve or Carrie if you are interested or know of someone who may be. Call 01931-715500

The bank holiday has been very busy with sales of nearly 600 drink sales on Saturday alone and numerous meals.

The Butchers Arms AGM is Saturday the 2nd July at 5pm.

There will be a hot buffet & vegetarian option also, this will be served at 7pm.

Please book direct with Carrie 01931-715500, Email is butchersarms.cumbria@gmail.com

 

  • The Butchers Arms walking group, has with the light nights, started meeting for its fortnightly Wednesday night walk followed by supper in the pub. For further information or to join the mailing list please contact me at at kitty.s65@btinternet.com
  • The Lyvennet Activity Group is coordinated by Joan Raine with support from other committee members. Joan has been successfully running a lunch club on the first Thursday in every Month. Anyone wishing to join the lunch club please contact Joan direct for more information on 01931-715351

Lyvennet Activity Group has run various fund raising events too, which has raised thousands of pounds for different charities. The last event in April raised £1,350 for Penrith Mountain Rescue Team.

The Charity music fest with live music and a hog roast is on Saturday the 13th August from 1pm. It is in the same field as last year, just up from the pub. It was well supported last year and raised £2,180 for 3 charities. I am trying to raise sponsorship to help cover costs. Anyone interested in helping with this should contact me directly at kitty.s65@btinternet.com

Anais, a French student, will be working at the Butchers Arms for a week in June and July to help improve her English language. It will be a good experience for her.

Kitty,

Secretary, Lyvennet Community Pub.